To get into the spirit of Halloween, Stussy teamed up with the legendary Creepy magazine for a series of tee shirts and hats, using original art pulled from the archives of Creepy.  Creepy was a hugely popular American horror-comic magazine launched by Warren Publishing in 1964. It was a black-and-white newsstand publication featuring art by some of the most influential comic book artists of all time, including  Frank Frazetta, Steve Ditko, Neal Adams and John Severin.  Creepy Magazine has been cited by many of the old school graffiti legends and illustrators from the skateboarding industry as a major influence on them when they were growing up.

We caught up with the current Creepy Magazine owner Dan Braun in New York to hear about this historical publication.

The Stussy x Creepy t-shirts are available now at Stussy.com and Stussy Chapter Stores.

+ VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

Creepy Magazine was an absolutely historical magazine published in 1964. Up until that time, from about 1955, in the comic industry there had been a code, a censorship code, that basically put almost all the horror comic publishers out of business. Up until the time that a young publisher named Jim Warren brought back this Creepy Magazine it was not a comic book format it was a magazine and that is what allowed him to sidestep the censorship code.

This was pretty hard stiff in 1964. It was an immediate success. Kids just went wild. In the back of the book you could buy all kinds of great horror goodies: films and posters and all kinds of amazing stuff. Basically the guy that created this created this whole world of access. Creepy was an amazing launching pad for some of the absolute legendary greats of the comic industry. The premiere fantasy illustrator of all time, Frank Frezetta, doing almost the first ten covers. Neil Adams who now is considered to be the preeminent Batman artist of this late 20th century. The one interesting through line: EC Comics were the comics that caused this censorship code. That was Tales from the Crypt, Vault of Horror. All those artists who were considered the pinnacle of the comic book industry all moved over to Creepy [INAUDIBLE]. You’re getting Wally Wood, Jon Severen, Gene Colon, Al Williamson. It was a fan’s dream when this came out.